Exhibitions

Curated by Niall McCormack This winter, the Museum is delighted to introduce a new exhibition of Irish label art from the 1890s to the 1990s. Included are vibrant examples of labels for minerals, beers, whiskies, hotels, linens, groceries, hotels, pharmacies, matches, charities and policital causes. The imporant...

A Letterpress Celebration of James Joyce's Ulysses Opening: Wednesday 15 June from 18.30 – 20.30 (free admission) To mark the 100th anniversary of the publication of Ulysses, the National Print Museum is delighted to announce the opening of a letterpress print celebration of James Joyce’s seminal novel.  Featuring...

The National Print Museum is delighted to announce a new multifaceted project which will introduce young (and not so young) audiences to the history of book making and a story of printing in Ireland. Through a National Print Museum published book and an exhibition titled Blot’s...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_id="digitalExhibitions"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text el_class="titleColourNPM" el_id="digitalExhibitionsIntro" css=".vc_custom_1629270565821{padding-bottom: 30px !important;}"] Digital Exhibitions Thanks to funding from the Heritage Council, the National Print Museum is proud to present online installations of four exhibitions previously held on our premises. We hope to continue...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="yes" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1629188286888{background-image: url(https://www.nationalprintmuseum.ie/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/InTheirOwnWords-Banner.jpg?id=10819) !important;}" z_index="" el_class="summer2021ProjectBanner"][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1625601212718{margin-top: 15% !important;margin-bottom: 17% !important;margin-left: 25% !important;padding-right: 5% !important;padding-bottom: 7% !important;padding-left: 5% !important;background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.75) !important;*background-color: rgb(0,0,0) !important;}" el_class="width40percent"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Green Sleeves: In Their Own Words: Printers and Designers [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="10px"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Seven decades of LP...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="yes" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1629289144986{background-image: url(https://www.nationalprintmuseum.ie/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/MainIntroductionBanner.jpg?id=10881) !important;}" z_index="" el_class="summer2021ProjectBanner"][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1625601212718{margin-top: 15% !important;margin-bottom: 17% !important;margin-left: 25% !important;padding-right: 5% !important;padding-bottom: 7% !important;padding-left: 5% !important;background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.75) !important;*background-color: rgb(0,0,0) !important;}" el_class="width40percent"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Green Sleeves: Full Introduction [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="10px"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Seven decades of LP covers in Ireland [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text el_class="NPMColourText"] Curated...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="yes" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" css=".vc_custom_1629013193830{background-image: url(https://www.nationalprintmuseum.ie/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/wall-of-sleeves-scaled-e1628952333473.jpg?id=10056) !important;}" z_index="" el_class="summer2021ProjectBanner"][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1625601212718{margin-top: 15% !important;margin-bottom: 17% !important;margin-left: 25% !important;padding-right: 5% !important;padding-bottom: 7% !important;padding-left: 5% !important;background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.75) !important;*background-color: rgb(0,0,0) !important;}" el_class="width40percent"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Green Sleeves: Sleeve Notes [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="10px"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"] Seven decades of LP covers in Ireland [/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height="20px"][vc_column_text el_class="NPMColourText"] Curated by...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" css=".vc_custom_1628781701987{background-color: #c1c1bf !important;}" el_class="protestBanner"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1628495036789{margin-top: 5% !important;margin-bottom: 6% !important;padding-right: 5% !important;padding-bottom: 40px !important;padding-left: 5% !important;background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.75) !important;*background-color: rgb(0,0,0) !important;}"][vc_column_text el_class="whiteText"]

Print, Protest & the Polls: The Path to the First Female Vote

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The Representation of the People Act was introduced to Parliament in 1918, which allowed for a select number of women (meeting certain criteria) to vote. This was preceded by a number of political and societal influences resulting from the outbreak of World War I in 1914, and the Easter Rising in Ireland in 1916.
The introduction and overview page for the Print, Protest & the Polls exhibition is here.
[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" css=".vc_custom_1628495164376{margin-top: 2% !important;margin-bottom: 2% !important;}"][vc_single_image image="10232" img_size="large" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" in_content_menu="in_content_menu" content_menu_icon="" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_class="vc_rowSummer2021" anchor="census" content_menu_title="Anti-sentiment"][vc_column width="1/2" el_class="topAligned"][vc_column_text]The Home Rule Bill for Ireland was passed in 1914, but the outbreak of the First World War in the same year postponed its enactment. The War divided the Irish suffragists, with some stepping back from suffrage activities to help in the war effort, and others distancing themselves from the events to continue to focus on suffrage. The struggle for Irish independence came to the fore for many politically involved women, with the formation of nationalist organisations such as the all-female auxiliary force of Cumann na mBan, and the Irish Citizen Army, which recruited men and women equally. An estimated three hundred women played a role in the 1916 Rising in Ireland. The 1916 Proclamation of the Irish Republic directly addressed the issue of female suffrage, stating that Ireland’s future National Government would be “elected by the suffrages of all her men and women”.
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Print, Protest & the Polls: Suffrage Action Recorded in Print

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Surviving contemporary photographs, newspapers, and print ephemera record a number of the many varied activities carried out by Irish suffragists in their efforts to win public and political support and achieve the right to vote. These records show brave and innovative forms of public protest, and their effective promotion and publicity of the cause.
The introduction and overview page for the Print, Protest & the Polls exhibition is here.
[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" css=".vc_custom_1628495164376{margin-top: 2% !important;margin-bottom: 2% !important;}"][vc_single_image image="10232" img_size="large" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" in_content_menu="in_content_menu" content_menu_icon="" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_class="vc_rowSummer2021" anchor="census" content_menu_title="Anti-sentiment"][vc_column width="1/2" el_class="topAligned"][vc_single_image image="10678" img_size="large" add_caption="yes" onclick="link_image" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]This press cutting was retained by suffragette Louisa (Isa) Lawler. Isa was the founding secretary/manager of Dublin's Gate Theatre, and was married to Hector Hughes, a co-founder of the Irish Socialist Party. Isa was the founding secretary/manager of Dublin's Gate Theatre, and was married to Hector Hughes, a co-founder of the Irish Socialist Party. Isa Lawler can  be  viewed  in  the  newspaper  clipping  on  the  second  from  the  left,  where  she  is  seen  campaigning  with  the  Irish  Women’s  Franchise  League  (IWFL)  on  the  streets  of  Dublin.  The  photograph  shows  how  the  suffragettes  worked  hard  to  display  an  alternative  image  of  their  campaign  to  the  public  in  contrast  to  the  negative  representations  showing  them  to  be  violent,  angry,  and  masculine.  The  newspaper  cutting  records  how  the  campaigners  sold  “fruit,  flowers  and  Suffragette  literature”,  and  played  “street  organs  in  aid  of  the  cause”.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="10977" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" onclick="link_image" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]The picture frame shows a portrait of suffragette Isa Lawler alongside a copy of a poem written by her husband Hector.  The opening letter of each line of the poem spells out Isa’s full name – Louisa – and the content speaks about her work as a suffragette.  It is likely that the poem was originally printed in a copy of the Irish Citizen.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" in_content_menu="in_content_menu" content_menu_icon="" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_class="vc_rowSummer2021" anchor="census" content_menu_title="Anti-sentiment"][vc_column width="3/5" el_class="topAligned"][vc_single_image image="10679" img_size="large" add_caption="yes" onclick="link_image" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]This  letter,  owned  by suffragette Isa Lawler, gives  instructions  to  suffragette  volunteers  on  what  to  do  after  their  arrest  following  militant  activity  in  Westminster. It is signed by the WSPU  leader,  Emmeline  Pankhurst.  Isa  was  a  militant  suffragette  with  the  IWFL,  and  was  imprisoned  for  breaking  three  panes  of  glass  in  a  window  of  the  GPO  in  Dublin  in  1912.  In  the  early  stages  of  this  period  of  the  suffrage  campaign,  the  IWFL  suffragettes  were  in  close  contact  with  the  WSPU,  with  some  IWFL  suffragettes  participating  in  militant  activities  in  England  with  the  group.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/5" el_class="topAligned"][vc_single_image image="10683" img_size="large" add_caption="yes" onclick="link_image" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]Irish Womens Franchise League fundraising Suffrage Dance ticket. This advertised an event which would never have taken place due to its scheduling coinciding with the week of the Easter Rising in 1916.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="grid" in_content_menu="in_content_menu" content_menu_icon="" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_class="vc_rowSummer2021" anchor="census" content_menu_title="Anti-sentiment"][vc_column width="3/5" el_class="topAligned"][vc_single_image image="11054" img_size="large" add_caption="yes" onclick="link_image" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]In November 1912, Meg Connery and fellow suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington were stationed at Lord Iveagh’s house in Stephen’s Green in an attempt to meet the politician Bonar Law, then leader of the British Conservative party. Law had refused to meet a group of suffrage delegates, and suffragists leafletted at all possible venues where he may have been in an attempt to doorstep him.
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Print, Protest & the Polls: Protest in Print

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Irish suffragists participated in the protest of the 1911 census of Britain and Ireland, which offered a large-scale opportunity for women in the suffrage campaign to mark their objections to their lack of a political voice. The later establishment of Irish suffrage newspaper The Irish Citizen in 1912 provided further opportunity to provide such a combined voice for Irish women. The newspaper was circulated throughout the thirty-two counties and provided a national platform for opinion from Irish women from all nationalist, suffrage and socialist groups.
The introduction and overview page for the Print, Protest & the Polls exhibition is here.
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Suffrage and the 1911 Census

These census forms mark an act of passive political resistance by Irish suffragettes. The 1911 census of Britain and Ireland offered a unique and large-scale opportunity for women in the suffrage campaign to mark their objections to their lack of a political voice. A considerable number of women from the campaign boycotted this event, arguing that they would not participate in a census when they were not represented with a vote.
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